Double Trouble // Two Reviews of Bad Boys and Mysterious Letters

HERE I AM // REVIEWING TWO BOOKS AT ONCE // BECAUSE I’M COOL

actually it’s just because i only have enough thoughts of juniper lemon for a small small small review, and i have too many thoughts of crash and uhh yeah here i am 


juniperlemonjuniper lemon’s happiness index

by julie israel
✫½

It’s been sixty-five days since the accident that killed Juniper’s sister, and ripped Juniper’s world apart.

Then she finds the love letter: written by Camilla on the day of the accident, addressed mysteriously to “You,” but never sent. Desperate to learn You’s identity and deliver the message, Juniper starts to investigate.

Until she loses something. A card from her Happiness Index: a ritual started by sunny Camie for logging positives each day. It’s what’s been holding Juniper together since her death – but a lost card only widens the hole she left behind. And this particular card contains Juniper’s own dark secret: a memory she can’t let anyone else find out.

The search for You and her card take Juniper to even less expected places, and as she connects with those whose secrets she upturns in the effort, she may just find the means to make peace with her own.

This is a smart, funny, poignant book guaranteed to make you laugh and cry – and maybe even take notes.

You know that feeling when you spend hours and hours and hours searching for something… and you just NEVER find it…?

YEAH. ME TOO.

I read this for BookTube-a-Thon, and I wish I hadn’t.

some reasons i wasn’t vibin’ with this

  • it read like a middle grade novel, to be honest. I felt like the author (or mc, whatever) was talking down to me as a reader half the time
  • juniper wasn’t all that likable, to be honest. she was pretty average and I feel like I should really like a character, you know?
  • the romance between Juniper and whatevertheguysnamewas (was it Brand) (I don’t even remember it, writing this review half a month later, which goes to show how memorable these characters weren’t) was lackluster and honestly did nothing for me
  • insignificant characters in my honest opinion
  • predictable
  • the ending was infuriating. so very infuriating. I like books with closure, okay? this book had no closure. NONE. that pissed me off

If you wanted me to be invested and then piss me off, let me read this book. The NUMBER ONE reason why this book flopped for me was because we never find out who ‘you’ is. So if you’re reading this to find out who ‘you’ is, don’t do it. This is a coming of age novel about a young girl who is dealing with her sister’s death.

And no, the sister did not commit suicide, if that’s also what you were thinking. She simply died.

If you’re okay with insignificant characters and predictable characters, read this book. Yes, I realize that the characters had their “place”, because I feel as though the author could’ve gotten the same affect with less characters.

And again, I’ll repeat, the romance sucked. I don’t remember if his name was Brand or what, but we’re going to refer to him as Brand, okay?

The romance was so short-lived and unnecessary. They could’ve been friends, and I would’ve been happy. They could’ve been enemies, and I also would have been happy. Also, as a side note on Brand the character, I felt as though Julie made him tortured to add dimension and that just did not work for me. I felt like he was a cardboard cut out of Tortured Bad Boy™.

tl;dr

Such a disappointing read. I get that some people appreciate “open-endings”, but I am not one of them.


crash (crash #1)crash

nicole williams

Jude Ryder and Lucy Larson are this generation’s Romeo and Juliet: Explosive. Sizzling. Tragic.

A steamy summer encounter with bad boy Jude means trouble for Lucy. Her sights are set on becoming a ballerina, and she won’t let anything get in her way . . . except Jude.

He’s got a rap sheet, dangerous mood swings, and a name that’s been sighed, shouted, and cursed by who knows how many girls.

Jude’s a cancer, the kind of guy who’s fated to ruin the lives of girls like Lucy—and he tells her so.

But as rumors run rampant and reputations are destroyed, Lucy’s not listening to Jude’s warning. Is tragedy waiting in the wings? This racy romance is hot, hot, hot!\

Referring to the summary… “This racy romance is hot, hot, hot!”

More like do not ready this obsessive romance, do NOT, NOT, NOT.

I genuinely cannot express my hatred for this book more than I will in this review. This book was problem after problem after problem. I started off by giving it 1.5 stars (half a star for being able to finish it, and half a star for the writer writing this monstrosity), but by the end of my Goodreads “reaction” review, I just… couldn’t. I dropped it to one star. I couldn’t justify the extra half.

lemme just…

mini sum of why i hated this “book”

  • the author fucking destroyed Sawyer’s characters, like oH MY GOD, he deserved better
  • Jude was not hot. Jude was a criminal. Jude was seriously a danger to society.
  • Lucy was desperate for “love” so she settled for Jude. Her whole fixing problems shit was hella annoying. All she did was want to fix Jude! You can’t fix a person! They have to fix themselves!
  • Crash was so cliched, it hurts

Diggin’ a lil deeper… I don’t give a fuck if Jude is “hot” or Sawyer is “preppy”, because Sawyer was the better choice… until the end of the book and Williams destroyed him. I mean, WOOOOO OKAY Jude is a Tortured Bad Boy™, let’s give him a medal! Better yet, a GIRL! No. No. No. Just because he’s “hot” and the residential bad boy, we need to have some common fucking sense, ladies.

Jude is a disaster and you all know it, your mother knows it, your father knows it, your dog knows… You know it. Jude is borderline a criminal, and I don’t get why everybody (readers) sees through that and goes, “OHH but he’s so hot! He loves Lucy! Everything he does is for Lucy!”

He stole a car. HE STOLE A CAR.

I don’t give a shit if it was so he could be cool and drive Lucy to the homecoming! He could’ve taken her car! He could’ve done anything but steal a car! The worst part? In his mind he was borrowing. That is honestly the worst part. Theft is theft.

Worse than that, he left Lucy at the dance when the cops showed up because he stole the car. He left her there. And you know who saved her and brought her home? Sawyer.

Sawyer, the character that was destroyed to pieces. If you want to read more on that, you can read my Goodreads review and see the spoiler section, but I am unable to add spoilers here. Main point, Sawyer’s character was destroyed simply for the cause of putting Jude on a pedestal and making it “okay” for Lucy to go back to him at the end. Literally. The author destroyed Sawyer’s character for the sole purpose of glorifying Jude’s. Oh, look at Jude! He’s so great compared to Sawyer! Sawyer is horrible!!!!!!! Go Jude!11!!!!1!1

Okay, onto a few other points that need to be discussed regarding my hatred.

Lucy literally did whatever she thought Jude wanted her to, no questions asked. Okay, maybe a few questions, but in the end her hormones kicked in and bled through the voice of reason.

[Sawyer was] implying I had no backbone and did my boyfriend’s every bidding…

Yeah, well, you do, honey.

At this point in the novel, Lucy was ignoring Sawyer’s very existence, because guess what? Jude told her to. Yup. Jude told her to, so she pretended a person–one who was perfectly nice to her–didn’t exist. That’s the solution, isn’t it?

Jude was legit like, “Luce, don’t talk to Sawyer. He’s not good for you.” And she LISTENS. Not to mention the fact that EVERYBODY is telling her the exact thing but about Jude! But she doesn’t listen!!!!! What the hell!!!!

The ONE time she doesn’t listen to Jude is at the end of the novel when it was necessary for her to be noncompliant in order for the plot to move on. That’s just horrible.

I think the worst part about hating this book is that I read Williams’ other book, Lost & Found, and I loved it. This was just so very fucking pale in comparison.

tl;dr

I hated Lucy. I hated Jude. I hated what the author did to Sawyer. Holly was a fucking true. They were all tropes. It was so predictable. Stay far away unless you would like to commit self-mutilation.


Well guys!

That’s it for today 🙂

There’s my two reviews for two books that I just didn’t vibe with. Don’t be offended if you liked these books. Everybody has different tastes, and there’s nothing wrong with that!

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Review: Daughter of Smoke & Bone (Daughter of Smoke & Bone #1) by Laini Taylor

Daughter of Smoke & Bone is one of those slow-burn but amazing novels. It’s not necessarily going to grip you til the end (well, there’s a damn good chance that by the end of the novel it will…), but it was a hell of a good book.

A lil backstory for you lil peeps

I read this back in 2013, and I thought it was great. I never really continued it though. About a year later I bought book two, but again… Never continued it.

BUT LET ME TELL YOUUUUUUUU.

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Review: Cruel Crown (Red Queen #0.1-#0.2) by Victoria Aveyard

cruelcrownCruel Crown by Victoria Aveyard
Red Queen #0.1-#0.2

Two women on either side of the Silver and Red divide tell the stories no one else knows.

Discover the truth of Norta’s bloody past in these two revealing prequels to #1 New York Times bestseller Red Queen.

Queen Song

Queen Coriane, first wife of King Tiberias, keeps a secret diary—how else can she ensure that no one at the palace will use her thoughts against her? Coriane recounts her heady courtship with the crown prince, the birth of a new prince, Cal, and the potentially deadly challenges that lay ahead for her in royal life.

Steel Scars

Diana Farley was raised to be strong, but being tasked with planting the seeds of rebellion in Norta is a tougher job than expected. As she travels the land recruiting black market traders, smugglers, and extremists for her first attempt at an attack on the capital, she stumbles upon a connection that may prove to be the key to the entire operation—Mare Barrow.

Plus a Glass Sword sneak peek!

An exclusive excerpt of the hotly anticipated second book in the Red Queen series, Glass Sword, transports readers to the world of Silver tyranny, a Red dawn rising, and one girl’s resolve to break down the system that will hold her back no longer.

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Review: The Iron Traitor (The Iron Fey: The Call of the Forgotten #2) by Julie Kagawa

The Iron TraitorThe Iron Traitor by Julie Kagawa
The Call of the Forgotten #2
Young Adult | Fantasy | Romance
Published by Harlequin Teen on October 29, 2013
★★

In the real world, when you vanish into thin air for a week, people tend to notice.

After his unexpected journey into the lands of the fey, Ethan Chase just wants to get back to normal. Well, as “normal” as you can be when you see faeries every day of your life. Suddenly the former loner with the bad reputation has someone to try for-his girlfriend, Kenzie. Never mind that he’s forbidden to see her again.

But when your name is Ethan Chase and your sister is one of the most powerful faeries in the Nevernever, “normal” simply isn’t to be. For Ethan’s nephew, Keirran, is missing, and may be on the verge of doing something unthinkable in the name of saving his own love. Something that will fracture the human and faery worlds forever, and give rise to the dangerous fey known as the Forgotten. As Ethan’s and Keirran’s fates entwine and Keirran slips further into darkness, Ethan’s next choice may decide the fate of them all.

I don’t think I can accurately express how I felt about this book. I won’t lie—I don’t have fond feelings for The Iron Fey: The Call of the Forgotten. (Albeit, my feelings for The Iron Fey weren’t quite so fond either.) My problems with The Iron Fey trickled down into my problems with The Iron Fey: The Call of the Forgotten. Honestly, I just didn’t like this book.

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Review: The Dream Thieves (The Raven Cycle #2) by Maggie Stiefvater

The Dream Thieves

The Dream Thieves by Maggie Stiefvater
The Raven Cycle #2
Young Adult | Fantasy | Paranormal
Published by Scholastic Press on September 17, 2013
★★★★★

If you could steal things from dreams, what would you take?

Ronan Lynch has secrets. Some he keeps from others. Some he keeps from himself.

One secret: Ronan can bring things out of his dreams.

And sometimes he’s not the only one who wants those things.

Ronan is one of the raven boys—a group of friends, practically brothers, searching for a dead king named Glendower, who they think is hidden somewhere in the hills by their elite private school, Aglionby Academy. The path to Glendower has long lived as an undercurrent beneath town. But now, like Ronan’s secrets, it is beginning to rise to the surface—changing everything in its wake.

Of The Raven Boys, Entertainment Weekly wrote, “Maggie Stiefvater’s can’t-put-it-down paranormal adventure will leave you clamoring for book two.” Now the second book is here, with the same wild imagination, dark romance, and heart-stopping twists that only Maggie Stiefvater can conjure.

(I apologize in advance if this review is slightly all over the place. I tried my best to categorize my thoughts, but honestly, I just loved this book too much to be completely organized about this review. My apologies.)

I won’t lie and say that I liked Adam in the last book, because I really didn’t. There were so many scenes in The Raven Boys AND The Dream Thieves that made me want to hate Adam, but I couldn’t bring myself to do it. I would tell myself that I hated Adam, but then my friend would tell me why I shouldn’t, and I think, “Oh yeah. I suppose so. Poor Adam. Adam is misunderstood.”

Anyway, this entire review will not be about Adam. (Although I do want to point out that Adam does questionable things, but that is because even Adam himself does not understand who he is; he simply knows that he wants to become successful on his own, aka without the aid of Aglionby boys with money.)

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Review: Six of Crows (Six of Crows #1) by Leigh Bardugo

sixofcrows.jpgSix of Crows by Leigh Bardugo
Six of Crows #1
Fantasy | Young Adult
Published by Henry Holt and Company on September 29, 2015
Goodreads
★★★★★

Criminal prodigy Kaz Brekker has been offered wealth beyond his wildest dreams. But to claim it, he’ll have to pull off a seemingly impossible heist:

Break into the notorious Ice Court
(a military stronghold that has never been breached)

Retrieve a hostage
(who could unleash magical havoc on the world)

Survive long enough to collect his reward
(and spend it)

Kaz needs a crew desperate enough to take on this suicide mission and dangerous enough to get the job done – and he knows exactly who: six of the deadliest outcasts the city has to offer. Together, they just might be unstoppable – if they don’t kill each other first.

First off…

THIS BOOK WAS AMAZING

I didn’t want to believe everyone else when I started this book. I was like, “hey guys, ya’ll need to chill. It probably isn’t the shit. Hype is bs. Calm yourselves.”

Yeah… But then I picked the book up and read it.

And I honestly don’t think I’ve read such a compelling novel with the best characters since the Lunar Chronicles. As in, everyone is shipped with everyone and it’s beautiful because literally everyone has their own characterization and plot developments. Yeah, it’s that awesome.

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Review: The Lost Prince (The Iron Fey: The Call of the Forgotten #1) by Julie Kagawa

The Lost PrinceThe Lost Prince by Julie Kagawa
The Iron Fey: The Call of the Forgotten #1
Fantasy | Young Adult | Paranormal
Published by Harlequin Teen on October 23, 2012
★★★

Don’t look at Them.
Never let Them know
you can see Them.

That is Ethan Chase’s unbreakable rule. Until the fey he avoids at all costs—including his reputation—begin to disappear, and Ethan is attacked. Now he must change the rules to protect his family. To save a girl he never thought he’d dare to fall for.

Ethan thought he had protected himself from his older sister’s world—the land of Faery. His previous time in the Iron Realm left him with nothing but fear and disgust for the world Meghan Chase has made her home, a land of myth and talking cats, of magic and seductive enemies. But when destiny comes for Ethan, there is no escape from a danger long, long forgotten.

My name is Ethan Chase.
And I may not live to see my
eighteenth birthday.

I really don’t know what to think about this book still, and it has been a little over three days since I read it. About a year or two ago, I pretty much marathoned the first series, The Iron Fey, and from rereading my reviews, I only really liked The Iron Queen. I mean the other three books were decent, but The Iron Queen seemed to be the only one I truly liked. From what I remember, Meghan was my biggest problem.

Therefore, this book should’ve been a relief, right? New characters? Same world? (Because I did like the world.)

Well, not really.

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Review: The Raven Boys (The Raven Cycle #1) by Maggie Stiefvater

The Raven BoysThe Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater
The Raven Cycle #1
Young Adult | Paranormal | Fantasy
Published by Scholastic Press on September 1, 2012
★★★★

“There are only two reasons a non-seer would see a spirit on St. Mark’s Eve,” Neeve said. “Either you’re his true love . . . or you killed him.”

It is freezing in the churchyard, even before the dead arrive.

Every year, Blue Sargent stands next to her clairvoyant mother as the soon-to-be dead walk past. Blue herself never sees them—not until this year, when a boy emerges from the dark and speaks directly to her.

His name is Gansey, and Blue soon discovers that he is a rich student at Aglionby, the local private school. Blue has a policy of staying away from Aglionby boys. Known as Raven Boys, they can only mean trouble.

But Blue is drawn to Gansey, in a way she can’t entirely explain. He has it all—family money, good looks, devoted friends—but he’s looking for much more than that. He is on a quest that has encompassed three other Raven Boys: Adam, the scholarship student who resents all the privilege around him; Ronan, the fierce soul who ranges from anger to despair; and Noah, the taciturn watcher of the four, who notices many things but says very little.

For as long as she can remember, Blue has been warned that she will cause her true love to die. She never thought this would be a problem. But now, as her life becomes caught up in the strange and sinister world of the Raven Boys, she’s not so sure anymore.

From Maggie Stiefvater, the bestselling and acclaimed author of the Shiver trilogy and The Scorpio Races, comes a spellbinding new series where the inevitability of death and the nature of love lead us to a place we’ve never been before.

For years, I have been pressured to read this book. My book friends, my friends that have read it, Goodreads, BookTube–everywhere, everyone wants me to read this book. But finally, my English teacher decided to make The Raven Boys available for one of our Literature Circle books, and I snatched it up. A close friend of mine loves this series, and I figured why not?

Boy, am I glad that I decided to read this book. It was so good.

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Review: Winger (Winger #1) by Andrew Smith

Winger

Winger by Andrew Smith 
Winger #1
Young Adult | Contemporary | Realistic Fiction
Published by Simon & Schuster on May 14, 2013
★★★★★

Ryan Dean West is a fourteen-year-old junior at a boarding school for rich kids in the Pacific Northwest. He’s living in Opportunity Hall, the dorm for troublemakers, and rooming with the biggest bully on the rugby team. And he’s madly in love with his best friend Annie, who thinks of him as a little boy.

With the help of his sense of humor, rugby buddies, and his penchant for doodling comics, Ryan Dean manages to survive life’s complications and even find some happiness along the way. But when the unthinkable happens, he has to figure out how to hold on to what’s important, even when it feels like everything has fallen apart.

Filled with hand-drawn info-graphics and illustrations and told in a pitch-perfect voice, this realistic depiction of a teen’s experience strikes an exceptional balance of hilarious and heartbreaking.

There’s something incredibly refreshing about a book that focuses on growing up (Ryan Dean is 14 years old) and living your life yet still follows a plot. Although the plot wasn’t mountain moving like saving a country or destroying a government, it was very clear: get Annie to fall in love with Ryan Dean. That wasn’t exactly an easy task considering Ryan Dean was 14 and Annie was 16 along with the fact that Ryan Dean thinks every girl is hot. He’s also a major pervert.

“Oh, I forgot to tell you,” Annie said. “Did you bring any swim trunks? We have an indoor pool and Jacuzzi.”
“Wow,” I said. “No. I didn’t.”
I looked down, then shrugged and looked over at Annie and whispered, “I’ll go without.”

Therefore, not am I only glad that I get to read about a hilariously perverted 14 year old boy, I get to read a hilariously perverted 14 year old boy who learns that life is more about girls and more about living.

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